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11. Purposive interpretation of enactments and use of extrinsic materials

(1) In the interpretation of a provision of an enactment, an interpretation that would promote the purpose or object underlying the enactment (whether that purpose or object is expressly stated in the enactment or not) shall be preferred to an interpretation that would not promote that purpose or object.
(2) Subject to subsection (4), in the interpretation of a provision of an enactment, if any material not forming part of the enactment is capable of assisting in the ascertainment of the meaning of the provision, consideration may be given to that material —
(a) to confirm that the meaning of the provision is the ordinary meaning conveyed by the text of the provision taking into account its context in the enactment and the purpose or object underlying the enactment; or
(b) to ascertain the meaning of the provision when —
(i) the provision is ambiguous or obscure; or
(ii) the ordinary meaning conveyed by the text of the provision taking into account its context in the enactment and the purpose or object underlying the enactment leads to a result that is manifestly absurd or unreasonable.
(3) Without limiting the generality of subsection (2), the material that may be considered in accordance with that subsection in the interpretation of a provision of an enactment shall include —
(a) any explanatory statement or guidance relating to the enactment issued by the Board;
(b) any treaty or other international agreement that is referred to in the enactment; and
(c) any document that is declared by the enactment to be a relevant document for the purposes of this section.
(4) In determining whether consideration should be given to any material in accordance with subsection (2), or in determining the weight to be given to any such material, regard shall be had, in addition to any other relevant matters, to —
(a) the desirability of persons being able to rely on the ordinary meaning conveyed by the text of the provision taking into account its context in the enactment and the purpose or object underlying the enactment; and
(b) the need to avoid prolonging legal or other proceedings without compensating advantage.